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Currency - All prices are in AUD

Currency - All prices are in AUD

Bunk Bed Safety

Most people do not realize that bunk bed designs are actually regulated by the U.S. government, and while it can be difficult to appreciate some government regulations, we find these rules to be sensible and very important.  The safety requirements are not complicated and most people at Bunk & Loft Factory know them by memory.  

So, whether we are building one of our standard models or a variation to suit your particular needs, you can be sure that we take great care to be absolutely certain our designs meet or exceed the federal safety requirements.  

Are bunk beds safe?

Surprisingly, they appear to be about as safe as any other bed.  In fact, far more children are injured on regular beds than on bunk beds according to data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System.  This may be because kids fall while jumping on regular beds which is not really possible on bunk beds.  A bunk bed that meets the federal safety requirements minimizes the risk of a child rolling out of bed or getting trapped in a dangerous situation, but of course no bed or bunk bed can prevent injuries from horseplay or misuse.  

How old should kids be for bunk beds?

Children should be six years old to use an upper bunk or elevated loft bed.  This is an obvious problem for families moving children from cribs at 2-3 years old, which is why most of our beds can be set up not only as bunked or lofted beds but as normal height single beds.  

What kind of dangers do bunk beds pose?

The most common injuries are from kids falling while climbing down.  Any toddler can climb up a ladder but climbing down is far more difficult, so it is important to keep younger children from the upper beds.  Toddlers in general are at greatest risk from falls because they are short enough to walk and run and jump on the upper bunks and they are not yet fully able to foresee dangers around them.

The other area of risk, which has been virtually eliminated with the current safety standards, is the risk of entrapment, specifically, the risk of children being caught between the different parts of the bed or between the upper bed and the wall.  The openings between the parts of the upper bed are regulated multiple ways and all elevated beds are to have a safety rail on both sides of the bed, not just on the front.  Ladder openings in the safety rails should never be placed against a wall.

We promise...

...to build bunk beds that meet and almost always exceed all federal safety requirements, and we won't build anything that we don't think would be safe enough for our own children.  

If you have very young children in your home, we'll be happy to recommend modular versions of our beds to help ensure their safety until they're ready for an upper bunk.